A tiny gem: Hacquetia epipactis

Never has a plant been so misrepresented by a photo; this is a really lovely little plant and yet my photo of my plant, taken in haste, does not even begin to do it justice. I have my excuses but I am still ashamed.

Hacquetia is a hardy herbaceous plant with a name almost bigger than the plant itself. It is native to the European Alps and named after Belsazar Hacquet, an Austrian writer about alpines so very aptly named. It is the only species in the genus and it is a plant that is hardly likely to be confused with any other. From numerous, scaly buds emerge short stems with a ruff of five or six tiny leaves to form a neat saucer for a tight dome of tiny yellow flowers. It can be just a few centimetres high at first but can reach the heady heights of 10cm when fully grown, with extra, sterile ruffs of leaves.

In time each plant can spread into a clump up to 30cm across.

My plant had a tough start in life. Last year the newly planted bits were dug up and eaten by rabbits which is why I put the remaining fragments under a potentilla to keep it in shade and also prevent me digging it up by accident. I am still doing too much heavy work to sensibly plant such a tiny gem.

Having said all that, this is one tough cookie, that will grow in shade under shrubs and is not at all difficult to please. It would be perfect for  paving in shade too. I hope it settles down now and will be more photogenic and less covered in compost in future.

Geoff’s rating

8/10

Garden rating

6/10 – a bit diminutive to make much of a show.

 

 

2 Comments on “A tiny gem: Hacquetia epipactis”

  1. Paddy Tobin
    March 14, 2020 at 11:24 am #

    Very pretty little thing. I have found it slow to increase but it’s still going so I won’t complain too much. The plain green plant grows better for me – perhaps a more suitable position!

    • thebikinggardener
      March 23, 2020 at 1:55 pm #

      The variegated one (‘Thor’) is a lovely thing but I need to make some cosy, sheltered places where it won’t get squashed before I risk something so fine.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sweetgum and Pines

gardening in the North Carolina piedmont

Ravenscourt Gardens

Learning life's lessons in the garden!

RMW: the blog

Roslyn's photography, art, cats, exploring, writing, life

Paddy Tobin, An Irish Gardener

Our garden, gardens visited, occasional thoughts and book reviews

AltroVerde

un altro blog sul giardinaggio...

vegetablurb

four decades of organic vegetable gardening and barely a clue

The Long Garden Path

A walk round the Estate!

Flowery Prose

Welcome to Flowery Prose! Growing words about gardening, writing, and outdoors pursuits in Alberta, Canada.

ontheedgegardening

Gardening on the edge of a cliff

Uprooted Magnolia

I'm Leah, a freelance Photographer born and raised in Macon, GA, USA. I spent 8 years in the wild west and this is my photo journal on life, love, and the spirit of Wyoming. Welcome to Uprooted Magnolia.

Interesting Literature

A Library of Literary Interestingness

Garden Variety

A Gardening, Outdoor Lifestyle and Organic Food & Drink Blog

For the Love of Iris

Articles, Tips and Notes from Schreiner's Iris Gardens

One Bean Row

Words and pictures from an Irish garden by Jane Powers

Plant Heritage

We are working to conserve the nations garden plants for people to use and enjoy today and tomorrow

HERITAGE IRISES

An English persons experience of living and gardening in Ireland

%d bloggers like this: