Seedling progress report

I thought I ought to do a more general update of some of the seedlings and how they are getting on. Here is a fairly random selection of seedlings with photos taken yesterday. In no particular order:

Not something I grow every year, this is Chenopodium capitatum, sometimes known as strawberry sticks or strawberry blite. Related to spinach, it has leaves that can be eaten and berry-like fruits that look tasty but prove that looks aren't everything. I sowed a couple of seeds per cell. I will plant out at the end of April.

Not something I grow every year, this is Chenopodium capitatum, sometimes known as strawberry sticks or strawberry blite. Related to spinach, it has leaves that can be eaten and berry-like fruits that look tasty but prove that looks aren’t everything. I sowed a couple of seeds per cell. I will plant out at the end of April.

This is a new addition to the garden here but an old friend and one of my favourite geraniums. This is G. pyrennaicum 'Bill Wallis'. It is a short-lived perennial that usually self seeds and has a loose habit and masses of small, lilac/lavender flowers all summer. It is best in informal situations and these will go in grass in part shade. The seeds were sown in February in a cell tray and kept at ambient temperature (no artificial heat). They were transplanted into these cells a week ago.

This is a new addition to the garden here but an old friend and one of my favourite geraniums. This is G. pyrenaicum ‘Bill Wallis’. It is a short-lived perennial that usually self seeds and has a loose habit and masses of small, lilac/lavender flowers all summer. It is best in informal situations and these will go in grass in part shade. The seeds were sown in February in a cell tray and kept at ambient temperature (no artificial heat). They were transplanted into these cells a week ago. The white form of the species ‘Celtic White’ is one plant I wish I had not put in the garden and is a *@&&?* nuisance.

The antirrhinums, sown in late January and early February are growing well and will go outside in a week or so now they are getting a decent size.

The antirrhinums, sown in late January and early February are growing well and will go outside in a week or so now they are getting a decent size.

The early March-sown schizanthus are doing well and although most are in my standard small cell trays I have potted some in large pots, three plants in each. I hope these will make nice, bushy plants this way. I really like schizanthus and although they do not flower as long as most bedding plants the delicate shape of the flowers and the marvelous array of colours is unique.

The early March-sown schizanthus are doing well and although most are in my standard small cell trays I have potted some in large pots, three plants in each. I hope these will make nice, bushy plants this way. I really like schizanthus and although they do not flower as long as most bedding plants the delicate shape of the flowers and the marvelous array of colours is unique.

I am growing three types of onion from seed and more from sets. These are outside now to harden them off for planting in about two weeks, in their clumps. I will thin them out over the next month, pulling out the spares as scallions. Like all the seedlings that have been in their cells for a few weeks and are getting a decent size these are getting liquid fertiliser every week.

I am growing three types of onion from seed and more from sets. These are outside now to harden them off for planting in about two weeks, in their clumps. I will thin them out over the next month, pulling out the spares as scallions. Like all the seedlings that have been in their cells for a few weeks and are getting a decent size these are getting liquid fertiliser every week.

The key to growing lettuce is to keep on sowing them and as soon as I have some ready for planting out I sow some more. I also grow lots of different varieties to try to avoid a glut. I am also growing a few mixtures to spread the cutting times. The greenhouse-grown salad leaves and lettuce are at their peak now and will have to be removed in mid to late  April to make room for the tomatoes and, by then, I will be able to cut some of these.

The key to growing lettuce is to keep on sowing them and as soon as I have some ready for planting out I sow some more. I also grow lots of different varieties to try to avoid a glut. I am also growing a few mixtures to spread the cutting times. The greenhouse-grown salad leaves and lettuce are at their peak now and will have to be removed in mid to late April to make room for the tomatoes and, by then, I will be able to cut some of these.

The first batch of calabrese (bottom left) and cabbage have just been put outside. They are very leafy and, in the sunny, windy conditions outside are prone to drying out and wilting. A few days more and they will get over that and will be ready to plant out. The calabrese should have cropped by early June and they will be planted around the edge of the bed where I am planting the courgettes so will be removed as the courgettes need more room.

The first batch of calabrese (bottom left) and cabbage have just been put outside. They are very leafy and, in the sunny, windy conditions outside are prone to drying out and wilting. A few days more and they will get over that and will be ready to plant out. The calabrese should have cropped by early June and they will be planted around the edge of the bed where I am planting the courgettes so will be removed as the courgettes need more room.

I am growing more flowers for drying this year and am making sure I have plenty of statice (limonium). I am growing a mixture this year though. Statice is easy enough to grow but I discovered that slugs and snails like the taste of helichrysum (bracteantha) even more than hostas!

I am growing more flowers for drying this year and am making sure I have plenty of statice (limonium). I am growing a mixture this year though. Statice is easy enough to grow but I discovered that slugs and snails like the taste of helichrysum (bracteantha) even more than hostas!

After the disappointment that was dahlia 'Fireworks' last year I am not growing any from seed this year except for these which are ex 'Twynings After Eight'. They should be similar to the parent and have dark leaves and single, white flowers tinged with pink. They were only sown two weeks ago but grow really fast.

After the disappointment that was dahlia ‘Fireworks’ last year I am not growing any from seed this year except for these which are ex ‘Twynings After Eight’. They should be similar to the parent and have dark leaves and single, white flowers tinged with pink. They were only sown two weeks ago but grow really fast.

This year I am determined to grow some decent celeriac and am giving them an early start. It was F1 hybrid seed and I only got 36 seedlings out of the pack so they will have 5 star treatment

This year I am determined to grow some decent celeriac and am giving them an early start. It was F1 hybrid seed and I only got 36 seedlings out of the pack so they will have 5 star treatment

 

 

 

 

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4 Comments on “Seedling progress report”

  1. Maria F.
    April 5, 2015 at 10:12 pm #

    Beautiful, you are so talented!

  2. joy
    April 6, 2015 at 9:32 am #

    looking good it will soon look like a garden centre but much cheaper and better

  3. Meriel
    April 6, 2015 at 8:31 pm #

    I was just thinking the same as Joy! I have had the same experience with a white Geranium pyranaceum, it seeds everywhere especially in the gravel. Like you I love G. Py. ‘Bill Wallace’. Did you save your own seeds?

    • thebikinggardener
      April 6, 2015 at 8:46 pm #

      I am glad I am not the only one to have trouble with the white one – I wondered if it was just me. No I got fresh seeds of Bill Wallis – from Chiltern I think or maybe plantworld seeds. My plants are the other side of the Irish sea so I had to start afresh here. I hope it likes conditions here and settles down and seeds around – I can never have enough of that colour

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